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Plants & gardening
48 replies
190 days old
last post: Jan 17, 2016
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Plants & gardening

1 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-11 12:55
Now we're approaching harvest season, let's talk about plants! Do you have a favourite plant or flower? A clever idea for the garden? Post it here!

It's my first year growing a garden allotment after a gap, so I'm trying simple stuff - potatoes in a tyre stack, onions, peas, tomatoes, and strawberries. Strawberries are more difficult than I thought, the bugs and birds keep getting to them before me! I'm growing some chillies indoors too, I think next year I will try a small hydroponic system for them, it looks challenging but interesting.
2 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-13 00:10
Potatoes. Potatoes. Potatoes.
Onions. Spinach. Kale. Lettuce. All things I eat. Sunflowers and pumpkins because I love to just look at them, they are my favorite plants.
3 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-13 17:09
>>2
Sunflowers are excellent - I started some this year, but alas they were devoured by slugs before the nematodes for control arrived!

Do you have a species of pumpkin you recommend?
4 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-14 16:57
I used to have some lemon trees and a pumpkin vine but squirrels kept eating the shit out of everything. FUCK SQUIRRELS.
5 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-15 03:26
>>4
Why not shoot them?
6 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-15 09:12
I've had to trim down the edges of the lawn far too often because kikuyu grass keeps trying to reach out onto the walkway. I've tried a mild concentration of weed killer, but that didn't take out all of them, so I used salt instead of a weed killer concentrate. That was effective, to say the least. That, however, left a rather messy patch of soil with dead kikuyu grass and other grasses that end up being a source of muddiness every now and then.

I keep forgetting to use the same technique to handle the driveway and the rear of the house, since grasses from the neighbors keep seeping through.

We once had a large passionfruit growth, but had to cut it down because the new vines crept over the old vines and made everything stoop over and fall, which was rather bad. We couldn't keep it up to shape, so we were rather content with the decision. I plan to plant passionfruit again when we get the landscaping sorted.

I'm planning to get a nice plant in my room so I can tend to it. I'm thinking a small pot with mint!
7 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-15 15:02
Come on insects, try and get my strawberries now! I spent the afternoon putting up a net over the container to keep the birds away, then putting metaldehyde pellets down and erecting small structures to keep the fruit off the ground. I hope it works.

>>6
Glyphosate works, but it takes ages to actually kill off the plant it seems. Especially if they're a weed with large underground stores, I think.

Indoor plants are nice! I've started some Acer seedlings that I hope to keep indoors, but I'm now on the hunt for a trailing indoor plant to grow from the bookcases...
8 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-17 20:54
>>6
Wow, passionflower seems to be really hard to grow from seed:

When using this technique on fresh seed you can expect germination within two to four weeks, but older seed will take between four and eight weeks. Do get too worried if yours are taking longer as periods of 12 to 48 weeks are not exceptional.
9 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-20 20:29
Something I'm really looking forward to is Openfarm.
https://openfarm.cc/
It's not done yet, but basically it's Wikipedia for growing food.
10 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-21 19:00
>>9
Interesting. After looking through some of the guides I think I still prefer the RHS site though, there's nothing like 200 years of experience backing up a guide! It will be useful if it expands though, so much information is just lost in gardener's forums archives...

The technological explosion in gardening is interesting though. There's a company local to me who are doing aerial surveys for local farms using a quadcopter+multispectral camera.

I'm currently working on a long duration above/below ground WiFi temperature sensor (MSP430/ESP8266 based) to satisfy my curiosity; I'm having trouble figuring how to get the data to a web-page though, having never done any web development before!
11 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-22 08:31
>>10

Apparently this guy can do it.
https://twitter.com/jeroen_heymans/status/583025932425945088/photo/1
So can you!

I've wanted to make a watering system for a couple plants once I get an apartment with a raspberry pi.
12 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-29 12:21
>>10
Oof! Running an entire webserver on an ESP might be a bit tricky, but it might be worth it to run a centralized webserver on something like a Raspberry Pi or a spare PC and have the ESP act as a little HTTP client that sends its updates to it. That'd be especially useful if you plan on deploying multiple ESP's!
13 Name: Anonymous : 2015-07-31 19:33
>>12
Aha, you've correctly understood my problem! While I understand how to make a basic webpage on a ESP or transfer data by HTTP POST/GET, I don't know how to a) log these results to a file on a separate device and b) display the recorded results on an automatically updating web page. I already have an RPi running a few things, I just don't know how to get the data to it...
14 Name: Anonymous : 2015-08-23 11:29
>>13
Can you elaborate your problem/goal? I do a bit of hobbyist webdev, maybe I can be of help.
15 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-10 20:39
The sundew (Drosera Capensis) I received from a friend has finally recovered its dew! Apparently the shock of a new place stops them producing it, but it comes back once they've adapted to the new situation.

http://imgur.com/a/SsR0X

Muahaha, I hope many flies are led to their deaths by it!
16 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-16 15:10
>>15
I have an african violet and a spider plant myself. The violet has yet to bloom. Nice camera.
17 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-18 19:18
>>16
African violets are nice, I don't think I've seen one before! Are they perennial?

Thanks, the pictures were actually taken with an old Canon FD mount 70-310mm that I got off eBay for £20 - if you can deal with manual focus, there are some great lenses out there for very low prices. Body was a NEX-5N.
18 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-21 01:26
I pulled up my tomato plants today; winter's coming.
19 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-21 07:31
>>18
Nice! How much did you harvest?

Do you have any plans of what to do with the tomatoes?
20 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-22 07:03
>>19
We got a pretty decent haul this year. Some we just ate, and some will become my mom's famous pasta sauce.
21 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-22 12:41
I got these pencils from Wikipedia that grow into food when you use them up and plant the ends of them.
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0160/7500/collections/MG_7335_1920.jpg?v=1426630142
22 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-22 19:12
>>21
Wow! I wonder how they work. I once saw plantable paper, but I don't know how you'd embed the seeds in wood.
23 Name: Anonymous : 2015-09-23 02:33
>>22
The seed shit is in the black end.
24 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-11 13:19
My plant did a thing →/318/IMG_4845.jpg
I wasn't aware it could do said thing.
25 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-11 14:51
>>24
Succulent flowers are amazing!
26 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-11 19:01
>>24
Will it produce seeds?
27 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-11 20:21
>>26
I don't know, you tell me. I wasn't even aware there was a term for this type of plants before >>25-san spoke the truth.
28 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-11 21:07
>>27
Hmm, I can't seem to properly identify the plant. The leaf rosettes/stem suggest it's an Echeveria but the flowers are a little odd, Echeverias usually have a sort of "trail" of flowers rather than a burst. It's perhaps a hybrid, though I have no idea which one or hybridised with what.

Either way, as with most succulents; It'll produce seed, but it's so fine it'll be difficult to use (though you can if you want!). Propagation is generally done from leaf or stem cuttings.
29 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-25 10:01
http://i.imgur.com/IlxDpIY.jpg

I didn't realise peppermint was capable of flowering.

They grow so virulently I thought they just propagate themselves by rooting branches that fall off or something!
30 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-25 19:31
>>25
Holy heck that is beautiful!

What type of plant is that? I'm new to planting but I'd definitely would love to try it as my first plant.
31 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-25 19:32
>>24
that's is freaking beautiful man. i'm new to gardening, I just opened this thread out of curiosity but i would love to try planting out, specifically that one!
32 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-26 00:54
>>24
I just want you to know that I ordered some gardening things.

I don't know if it's the same plant as the one in your picture but i bought some seeds of Kalanchoe rotundifolia.

Anyway, it was just a really nice picture. Have a nice day!
33 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-26 10:29
>>32
Wow, the leaves on those are really neat. They look almost geological.
34 Name: Anonymous : 2015-10-28 22:50
>>24-san here
Glad you guys like my plant and very happy to see people getting into gardening because of it. I have somehow managed not to kill my other plants (even though some got very thirsty at times), will post an updated picture of my windowsill later.
35 Name: Anonymous : 2015-11-22 17:37
What about psychedelic cactus? Does anyone here grow Peyote, San Pedro or Peruvian torch?

Or any psychoactive plant in general. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_psychoactive_plants
36 Name: Anonymous : 2015-11-22 19:24
>>35
Hahaha, I thought you were joking. I had no idea you could get high off cactus.
37 Name: Anonymous : 2015-11-22 20:26
>>35
Opium poppies are fairly common in the UK. Only gets illegal once they're scored.

I've even got an old 1940s gardening book that gives instruction on how to actually extract the opium (for the war effort of course, ahem).
38 Name: Anonymous : 2015-12-13 01:10
I've started some avocado seeds in water. Once they grow, i'll take photos.
39 Name: Anonymous : 2015-12-14 09:34
>>38
I'm amused to find the wikipedia article on avocados has a "Avocado-related international trade issues" section.
40 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-07 11:30
My chilli plant finally ripened! I used the flesh in a chilli con carne, but saved the seeds to plant again next year. Need to germinate them earlier next time though, I started this plant last March and have only just harvested it 9 months later...
41 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-09 10:00
>>38
Ive heard avocado trees take a while to bear fruit.
Then again, ive also read an article from someone who had an avocado tree around their house as a child, and said it produced so much fruit they were throwing large amounts away every year.
42 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-09 20:16
This is my spider plant and african violet. https://i.imgur.com/EdL0wvz.jpg
43 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-12 05:34
>>42
I don't know a lot about gardening, but they look like they're coming along very nicely. Good job!
44 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-12 23:17
>>42
Nice spider plant! Why not try propagating some of the spiderlings and giving them to friends?
45 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-14 23:42
I spent two nights at a friends house who are the kindest people I know.
46 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-14 23:46
>>45
WRONG TREAD GOMEN NASSAI ANAONYMOUS SAMA
47 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-17 14:25
Had to throw a few plants out that didn't survive my vacation :(
But i'll plant new ones!
48 Name: Anonymous : 2016-01-17 19:31
>>47
Oh man, same ;_;

rip peace lily

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