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How to become more selective with online communities?
47 replies
37 days old
last post: Feb 28, 2020
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How to become more selective with online communities?

1 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 09:53
How do you normally decide what websites and parts of the internet that you become part of to consider your own personal "home" online? I literally have hundreds upon hundreds of bookmarks and I struggle so hard with trying to figure this out. Any advice or tips on what I should do?
2 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 11:18
Get a hobby instead, anon.
3 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 14:46
Could you link some of those sites? I go to the same handful of sites daily, so I'm in a bit of a rut.
4 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 17:04
>>2
I way too many interests and hobbies. It's hard for me to be selective with those as well. I range from watch anime, sing, draw, take photography, edit videos, play video games, and obsess over stuff from when I was a kid (extreme nostalgia). There's a lot more than what I just mentioned.

>>3
Where would you want me to start? What type of websites are you interested in?
5 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 19:19
>>4
I way too many interests and hobbies.
If your list is long, those aren't hobbies. Those are just things you enjoy (nothing wrong with this). Hobbies are something you can pour hours of days of months into without breaking a sweat. You need an actual hobby, something to stick with.
6 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 19:33
>>5
I guess you're right. Any recommendations how to narrow something down?
7 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 20:46
>>6
Not have ADHD, I guess is where I would start. Yeah that was rude, but come on, do you really not have a a handful of things to say "Yes, I definitely like doing these things more than those things and I want to become even more proficient at"? Basically a ranking system in your mind of what you like to do (or in line with your title, which websites you prefer). Like when you draw, do you not have a spark in your heart that says "Wow, I really wish I could draw this better than my current skill level. Maybe I should spend some time trying to improve?"

I get that browsing websites, especially a ton of them, is excellent filler, but if you don't have that main event to always fall back to, most people (exceptions always exist) are likely to regret not having a hobby.
8 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-23 22:27
>>6
>>4
You shouldn't have time to idle on the internet if you have hobbies you're passionate about. From the way you talk, and the mention of nostalgia, it looks like you're just really bored.
If you get a list of media to consume you'll only get a temporary fix. To do something long-term for yourself you're going to need to do some soul-searching to find out what really attracts you about your current interests and try to focus on that activity. It won't be as immediately rewarding as consuming media so you'll have to suffer a bit for it.
9 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-25 06:59
>>8
Not that anon but I've been struggling with this for awhile. I'm not really sure what I enjoy, but I feel like I'm on the verge of figuring it out. It's just that I spend so much time browsing these sites because I wanna get closer to finding that truth. Plus I like hearing about things I've already found. I suppose it's become an addiction. But I can't settle because I'm not truly complacent yet.
Btw, if anyone knows of a good place to discuss East Asian history please let me know. I've recently found enjoyment in the Three Kingdoms period and finding a place to talk about that would be nice.
10 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-25 14:42
>>9
if anyone knows of a good place to discuss East Asian history please let me know.
This is what makes me miss university sometimes, it's the best environment to talk about this academic stuff.
11 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-26 00:29
>>4
Just list them all off for me. I'm looking for something that will "wow" me.
12 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-26 04:44
I really, really wish message boards were still around like they were in the 2000s/very early 2010s. I miss writing long-form, seeing well-crafted humour and in-jokes, and knowing people by handle and avatar.
13 Name: Anonymous : 2020-01-26 22:02
>>12
I just want the enthusiasm I had back then.
14 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-13 15:03
>>1
I abandon ship when I see a presence or containment section for porn, sexuality and everything remotely fetishistic like children's cartoons and videogames, or post-90s anime.
I used to be more open minded but sex is an invasive weed that turns any harvest into a wasteland.
15 Name: Paperplane : 2020-02-13 16:56
>>14
I see where you're coming from but this wierd specification of
post-90s anime
makes me curious. There's definitely stuff you appear to despise in 90s anime already, even in 80s anime so I don't really get that distinction.
16 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-13 17:44
>>15
post-90s is a guarantee
17 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-13 19:00
>>14
>>16
Not to sound like a big nitpicky asshole (yeah, right!), but I can think of at least two anime series and a movie from before 1980 (long before, actually) that have sexual antics in them.
18 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-13 19:08
>>17
But I don't want to filter anime, I want to filter people. Post-90s is just a non-greedy match.
19 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-14 07:12
>>14
This is a very unpopular opinion to say the least. I think I understand you. Maybe. Except I am not that strict with the release year. There are many wonderful series in any era. But for some reason western "fans" act like it is their duty to perv and lust every character and humiliate them with their inane posts. Like it's a default behavior to be an annoying attention craving sexual maniac wannabe if you watched at least one anime. It is not my intention to sound arrogant, like i'm the only true anime/manga otaku, it is not true. These people ignore beautiful and innocent aspects of many certain anime and focus only on their made-up fetishes. I am not against erotic displays they can be done very good and even beautiful. I tend to dislike very cheap and blatant fanservice which happens sometimes but not very often. That being said, I do not visit such "discussion" boards for quite some years and barely had an opportunity to talk about something I enjoy. Because I know I won't find anythere there except the stuff described above and people insulting each other and characters for no reason, and I don't have energy to argue with them, to prove something. Honestly, I do not understand western anime watchers, especially the younger ones. In any case it was refreshing to see your post. Have a good day.
20 Name: Paperplane : 2020-02-14 07:50
>>19
No I totally get you and what >>14 are going for.
The western fanbase is very exhausting to be around since they've been laughing ober the same old jokes since 2013 or so
haha this girl has a penis I'm so horny, xDDD
x is my waifu
[smug anime girl]
I'm an ironic weeb haha
and the likes. And then you got shit like
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71-jPDolyQL._AC_SX569._SX._UX._SY._UY_.jpg
and people wearing this in public. It's all trodden ground and so formulaic. These people can't even express themselves without memes anymore and I can see why you would want to avoid them.
21 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-14 10:57
>>20
People really wear this?
Memes would be fine if they were for laughs. It took me a few episodes to take a step back but I think most people are stimulation addicts. It's not just sex, but sex is the first flag. It's become so normal that SFW doesn't mean anything, it's just the same environment with the lights on. SFW/NSFW is some Newspeak shit to begin with, like a way to reduce everything to a Venn diagram so things of higher value are degraded to the same level as porn and porn comes out elevated. I find it funny that NSFW is the same number of letters as porn except you have to hold shift, so it's shit even as shorthand. But even anons deliberately take extra time to type the all caps acronym.
22 Name: Paperplane : 2020-02-14 12:56
>>21
To each their own. What really bothers me is that they're so vocal about it and it gets too much focus.
23 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-14 19:02
>>20
Alright, I understand what you're saying now and agree - I haven't really enjoyed anime since, like, 2014 for the same reason, and it doesn't look like I will be in the future.
24 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-14 19:45
>>23
I wish it were just anime, it's anywhere millennials and younger hang out. I wonder how many people secretly hate it but won't dare say anything not to be eaten alive. Making this kind of statement publicly probably works the same as saying meat is murder.
25 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-15 03:12
We should just rename the species to homo coomens
26 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-16 00:07
I want to go back to pre smartphone era onegaishimasuru
27 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-16 06:36
>>26
Same here.

Has anyone else completely quit using cell phones altogether?
28 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-16 15:28
>>27
>>26
Smartphone normies are not the problem IMO, since they confine themselves to a handful websites anyway.
One nice way to build a community today would be to have an anonymous text board as a front, with a bridge between individual users that preserves anonymity in some way. Maybe something like PGP, though I don't know how it works so I might be wrong. Say, your posts have a hidden ID with a public key attached, and people can decide to encrypt their reply using that public key.

So the posts would look like
>>26
hello
##27
[garbled]

But the poster of >>27 would see the message.

Sometimes I want to send a private message to the person who wrote a post, but there's no way to do that except taking the conversation away from the board by leaving a contact for another platform. This was a nice thing in forums because you could send a PM seamlessly to other people in a confined space for a topic. You could do this on Reddit with multiple accounts I guess, but you'd have to be on Reddit.

I think the changes happened because the demographic of "nerds" who use the internet to escape normie life has changed, and even the people who used to be the original nerds with niche interests have aged and changed. And most people who want to chat privately for the sake of chatting these days are riddled with mental issues.
It's such a subtle feeling but I remember that posting publicly on the internet felt more like being in a room with a bunch of friends. Now it feels like you're stepping up with a microphone and talking to an audience and there might be cameras rolling. It's weird as hell.
29 Name: Paperplane : 2020-02-16 21:06
>>28
I think forums still do the trick for me. I recently became active in one that went online just a few weeks ago again and it honestly feels like old times. It's a very small community so it's more like the "room of friends" than a huge stage (which I would compare to all the big sites).
At least I'm having good conversations with the other regulars about all kinds of topics and there's already forming a tightly knit community, which I kinda missed from the 2000s internet.
But yeah, they're still there.
30 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-16 22:01
>>29
I recently became active in one that went online just a few weeks ago again and it honestly feels like old times.
Ugh, I would kill for this opportunity, especially if said community members only interacted through said forum and never started up a Discord room or anything like that. I really hope you can enjoy it for as long as humanly possible.
31 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-17 05:27
>>28
Your last paragraph explaining the demographics changing as well as the ones "riddled" with mental issues to the point you made about posting publicly on the internet feeling more like being ni a room with a bunch of friends and now stepping up on a stage with cameras rolling is spot on.

>>29
I miss forums, I've been considering seeking out a few to join myself. To get a kick of the old internet days. Again as >>30 said. Enjoy it for as long as you can. Hopefully it's a good long while.

I just don't even know what to expect out of internet communities throughout this decade, but it's going to get more scarce to find worthwhile places as each year and even the months goes by. I've read throughout various places that the internet as we know it or perhaps "lived it" will die with us or we may just so happen witness it's demise.
32 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-18 20:53
>>31

If you're worried about communities dying out then I highly encourage you to start your own. As long as you can get at least 1 or 2 other dedicated users that are fun to be around then the community is basically guaranteed to stick around and grow.

I've had pretty good luck with this both in the physical and virtual world. One of the longtime irc communities I was in died and I really wanted a kind of similar community to hang out in online, so I managed to round up a few of my friends and remnants of that irc server onto a matrix server and started a community on there. That community has been going strong for a year or so now. It's just the right size too, it's big enough to get a trickle of new people but not big enough to start attracting assholes and internet randos. In the physical world one of the programming meetups I was going to around town died so I got in contact with some local spaces and now I guess I'm organizing that meetup.

Be the change you want to see!
33 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-19 01:15
>>32
What is the IRC about?
34 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-19 04:45
>>3

I'm working on this right now so I might as well share it while I'm around checking out textboards:

https://msgbored.rvklein.ca/

It's an anonymous text chat. I am currently considering adding persistent identity key options to posting so one can cryptographically sign their messages to prove that said keyholder created a message. Right now the only poster ID is a bcrypt of the I.P. address with a client generated hash.

>>33
IRC is multiplayer notepad. It's a very simple communications protocol. There is virtue in simplicity though. I do recommend IRC to anyone that can follow tutorials.
35 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-19 09:00
Is the IRC channel here ever active?
36 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-20 10:14
>>34
I was asking what is the IRC channel about
>>35
AFAIK it's dead
37 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-20 12:37
It's crazy how just the amount of something changes the content... There are probably quality things here and there, but how do you find them? They're a needle in a haystack. If I join a community about a subject and ask a question, most people won't even understand the question. I remember when I joined this sort of serious writing community and the most respected opinions there came from people who published a slew of YA trash with shirtless guys on the cover. Even if you make a community that is built around higher standards and rejecting trash you're overrun with the contrarians from the same stock of people. Even colleges aren't safe from this anymore apparently. I miss college, it was a nice environment to meet people.
How do you even find anybody to connect with at this point? I feel like I don't even speak the same language. Do you just go all out and appear as nuts to 99% of everybody? How do I handle the constant disappointment inherent in that?
38 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-20 12:59
>>37
Or hey, maybe I'm part of that stock and I'm just yet another entitled guy without a clue. They call this Dunning-Kruger effect. How do I even find out? It's a catch-22, the only way to be reviewed by the peers you want is to find those people but you can't find them if you're not already there.
I'll never understand how people manage to get there, like... when Tarkovsky made Stalker he got panned 'cause the movie was slow, he said something like he should've made the movie slower so only the right people would stay in the theater. How do you even get the opportunity to get your shit screened with this mindset?
39 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-20 19:30
>>33
The current matrix channel is an agglomeration of a couple of social channels formed around IRL groups and the now-defunct IRC server that my college runs. If you're interested in checking it out we're at https://riot.firechicken.net

>>37
Yeah, college is kind of bad about this but it's fairly easy to identify the people there who actually care about their work and who put in enough effort to really create new things. It's definitely a decent way to meet people. I'm running some clubs at my old school so I still get to tap into that. Now though I'm out of school so my current solution to meeting people IRL is to hang out at local shows, the music gives you something easy to talk about and there's usually alcohol involved too which makes socializing so much easier. Local programming meetups are also a decent way to meet people, there's got to be some sort of local events happening around you
40 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-20 20:28
>>39
there's got to be some sort of local events happening around you
Nothing, this place is a wasteland.
I'm just starting to think I'm defective. It can't be that I can't find a place that is even barely OK enough so I can settle down, or that my deal breakers are this common.
If I could change interests I swear I would. The constant alienation is insane.
41 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-21 07:48
>>36
That's a shame. Seems like most of the time when I want to find a smaller IRC channel they're dead.
42 Name: Nika : 2020-02-23 05:50
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43 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-25 16:33
>>41
Some of the best IRC channels I've ever been in are internal channels on public access UNIX systems. Their communities are both relatively small, but dedicated enough to stay active. Since the community belongs to an entire computer system, and not just the IRC channel, there's always a lot of interesting and cool community attractions, like multiplayer text based games made by other members, bulletin board systems, and the personal web pages. Check out htts://tildeverse.org, it's a good way to find some of the most active systems. SDF is one of the original systems from way back, but as far as I know, it's activity is slowly lagging.
44 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-25 22:02
>>43
I can't imagine bothering to SSH into a UNIX system only to find the same people as everywhere else in this subculture, talking about programming, porn and mental illness.
45 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-25 23:22
>>44
I can't speak for the other servers since I'm only active in one of them, but the one that I am on is dominated by people interested in art, music, and writing. A lot of discussion is just people talking about their day. I only really see people talking about programming as part of complaining about work, and art projects where it's part of the composition. SDF is a similar way, one of their big attractions is the amount of writing they do, and the net radio shows a couple of their members run. ~town is great, but I know a lot of people have a hard distate for the kind of CoC they have.

I can't deny that there isn't a large programming culture, though, and the majority of active IRC servers will be full of this type of discussion just by nature of who the platform attracts. Some of the more insufferable boxes I've poked my head into was entirely programming stuff. It's gotten pretty exhausting for me too, which is why I don't explore other places much anymore.
46 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-28 15:25
>>45
the kind of CoC they have
The CoC doesn't look too intimidating... is it full of you know whos?
47 Name: Anonymous : 2020-02-29 14:31
I just want to find an art community that isn't filled with developmentally stunted people.

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