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I can't draw!
15 replies
61 days old
last post: Sep 7, 2021
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I can't draw!

1 Name: Anonymous : 2021-07-23 23:00
Please help!
2 Name: Anonymous : 2021-07-24 17:27
Try learning the basics of perspective and also trying to draw what you see around you as best you can! Learning construction is the first step to drawing whatever you want.
That said, what are you trying to draw anon?
3 Name: Anonymous : 2021-07-24 22:28
>>2
I'm not trying to draw anything in particular, I just want to get basic drawing skills down. But I will try out what you said!
4 Name: Anonymous : 2021-07-27 00:56
Hi anon. If you can stomach lots of technical exercises, drawabox.com seems to be a good way to get into drawing. I only did a few exercises, but felt like I was actually improving as I went.
5 Name: Anonymous : 2021-07-28 00:38
The exercises in drawing on the right side of the brain, Fun with a pencil (by Loomis), and Perspective Made Easy (by Norling) should get you started.
6 Name: Anonymous : 2021-08-03 23:30
Are you able to draw yet OP?
7 Name: Anonymous : 2021-08-15 08:26
The way I learned to draw was copying off of artists. If I saw something I thought looked cool I'd grab a pencil and copy it down and over time I grasped shapes and perspective and all that jazz.
Now I'm teh architect! Which really doesn't have as much drawing as I'd feared now...
8 Name: Anonymous : 2021-08-27 13:10
If you're still alive, OP, give drawabox a try. Just learning to draw with my shoulders helped me immensely.

Also remember to have fun with it from time to time. If you do nothing but exercises, you'll burn out pretty quick.
9 Name: Anonymous : 2021-08-28 19:56
I think painting is much more approcheable and less gruelling than drawing. It's also more fun.
10 Name: Anonymous : 2021-08-31 17:01
I think it depends on the person really.
11 Name: Anonymous : 2021-09-01 07:33
https://cloud.kursksu.ru/my/PersonDocument/23199/methodical_materials/%D0%9A%D0%BD%D0%B8%D0%B3%D0%B0_%D0%9B%D0%B0%D0%B1%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%B0%D1%82%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%BD%D1%8B%D0%B9_%D0%BF%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%BA%D1%82%D0%B8%D0%BA%D1%83%D0%BC.docx
12 Name: Anonymous : 2021-09-02 09:23
I think the /ic/ guide for learning to draw is pretty good OP, I use it myself to learn
https://discover.hubpages.com/art/how-to-draw-learn
13 Name: Anonymous : 2021-09-06 01:26
seconding the ic guide. i learned to draw from it as well. drawabox.com is really good too.
14 Name: Anonymous : 2021-09-07 13:49
I found the biggest improvements happened when I started going to life figure drawing sessions, there was no guidance but it's great practice. It sucks at first but after some time you learn to use your time more and more efficiently and get a good grip on how to simplify shapes. If it's possible you should definitely give it a try.
Also fun to meet other people who are into art.
15 Name: Anonymous : 2021-09-23 03:23
You *can* draw, just maybe not in the way you intend to. Drawing is just
lines on a surface that try to evoke or represent something.

Also what and why is it that you want to draw? So far all we know is
that you "can't draw" and people have responded in equally vague ways
by linking resources that have worked for them (such as drawabox) that
they think would probably help you too. I do think drawabox is a great
site for learning structure and correct perspective, but note that I
specifically said "for learning structure and correct perspective".

If you want a result, you need to know what that result is. Else you'll
spend more time than you need to by following methods, hoping that you'll
reach.. something? Like climbing a ladder that's leaning against the
wrong wall.

If you *do* know what you want to draw, then I would highly recommend
browsing through Marshall Vandruff's Reviews & Recommendations:
https://marshallart.com/HOME/reviews

There are a *lot* of very solid books on there, most of which come with
some very insightful comments from Marshall himself on what and why
a book is great. It's mostly about learning to draw in the classical
sense (e.g. Rembrandt) but there's also general books on development &
creativity

If this is all a bit much to grasp, there are some very simple things that
you can do to significantly improve your drawing abilities no matter what
it is you want to draw; Learn & practice drawing straight lines, basic
shapes (circles, squares, etc.), and then basic forms (balls, cubes,
cylinders, cones, etc.). If you can draw these basic shapes *really*
well, the rest will fall into place. This is one of the things taught
in Scott Robertson's "How To Draw" book, among many others.

Note that I said "learn & practice". Drawing, at least in the classical
sense, requires a lot of repetition. It's about building muscle memory and
intuition. Which reminds me, do not treat a year as a long time. Learning
a skill like drawing, or any skill for that matter, takes several years to
reach basic competency & proficiency and a lifetime to reach mastery.

You need to have a strong desire to learn, to always hunger for more, to
a point where you never really stop learning, but always improving. Which
is why it's important to have it as a habit that's sustainable, otherwise
you'll burn yourself out and fall flat on the ground while snapping your
pencil in two.

So let me ask you again, what and why is it that you want to draw?

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